A Look at Race with Beverly Daniel Tatum

” ‘Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?’ “ was originally on one of my friend’s GoodReads lists, and I decided to add it to mine, given my recent interest in education and all things related to education.

This book really opened my eyes to racism and prejudice.  One would assume that being an Asian female, I would be more attune to racism and prejudice being a minority on two levels,  but to be honest, I’ve never really thought about it.  Even though I’ve spent much of my time growing up in predominately white communities, I’ve never felt like I was ostracized or called out for being Asian.

But this book made me realize that racism can be much more subtle than the KKK and that I have experienced racism, just not racism by its traditional definition.

The first thing to establish is Ms. Tatum’s definition of racism.  She uses David Wellman’s definition, which is a “system of advantage based on race.”  This is an important distinction from prejudice which is defined as “a preconceived judgement or opinion, usually based on limited information.”  So, for example, you don’t have to be a member of the KKK to be considered racist.  That’s considered overt racism.  Racism is living in a society where one group systematically gets benefits over another group.  One example she uses is when it comes to jobs.  If a White hiring manager sees two resumes that include race, if they are both roughly the same the “White” resume usually wins out over the “Black” resume.  The assumption isn’t that the Black job seeker is bad – the assumption is the White job seeker is better.

Ms. Tatum also focuses a lot on building positive and healthy racial identities.  To do this, she believes, you have to have a circle of friends who are the same race as you are, who can understand and relate to the experiences you experience.  You can only build a strong racial identity if you have this strong base, and through really understanding yourself, you will be able to better interact with other ethnic groups.  Although I can see where she’s coming from, I am a bit worried about what this means.  If everyone feels closest to those who are like them, how will we ever truly get rid of racism – how will we ever truly be color blind?

Overall I think this book was incredibly insightful and definitely worth a read if you’re interested in racism, and tangentially how that manifests itself in education.  I think the one issue that this book doesn’t address that I wish it did is poverty.  I think that poverty and racism are closely related, and I would definitely like to read her views on how the two are connected.  m are very closely intertwined, and I would have liked to read her opinion

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